California

Despite drought warnings in California, increasingly strong storms are expected to bring heavy snow to Mammoth Mountain Ski resort, enough to open the resort two weeks early.

The strong storms are expected at the beginning of next week and will spread throughout California, bringing rain and snow in some areas.

"By Saturday night, a rapidly intensifying Pacific cyclone directing a powerful atmospheric river squarely at the West Coast delivers a fire hose of rich subtropical moisture into California," the National Weather Service said.

"Snow levels will be low enough to blanket the Sierra Nevada in heavy snow on Sunday while prolonged periods of rain soak the coast and valleys of northern and central California."

The Mammoth Mountain Ski Area near Yosemite National Park announced its opening on October 29, two weeks earlier than previously anticipated.

For more reporting from the Associated Press, see below:

Rain in San Francisco
Despite drought warnings in California, increasingly strong storms are expected to bring heavy snow to Mammoth Mountain Ski resort, enough to open the resort two weeks early. A pedestrian carries an umbrella while crossing a street at Fisherman's Wharf in San Francisco on October 20. Jeff Chiu/Associated Press

A flood warning was posted in part of Siskiyou County bordering Oregon, where "local law enforcement reported debris flow and flooding on roadway from excessive runoff," according to the National Weather Service's office in Medford, Oregon.

Californians rejoiced this week when big drops of water started falling from the sky for the first time in any measurable way since the spring, an annual soaking that heralds the start of the rainy season following some of the hottest and driest months on record.

But as the rain was beginning to fall on Tuesday night, Governor Gavin Newsom did a curious thing: He issued a statewide drought emergency and gave regulators permission to enact mandatory statewide water restrictions if they choose.

Newsom's order might seem jarring, especially as forecasters predict up to 7 inches (18 centimeters) of rain could fall on parts of the Northern California mountains and Central Valley this week. But experts said it makes sense if you think of drought as something caused not by the weather, but by climate change.

For decades, California has relied on rain and snow in the winter to fill the state's major rivers and streams in the spring, which then feed a massive system of lakes that store water for drinking, farming and energy production. But that annual runoff from the mountains is getting smaller, mostly because it's getting hotter and drier, not just because it's raining less.

In the spring, California's snowpack in the Sierra Nevada mountains was 60 percent of its historical average. But the amount of water that made it to the reservoirs was similar to 2015, when the snowpack was just 5 percent of its historical average. Nearly all of the water state officials had expected to get this year either evaporated into the hotter air or was absorbed into the drier soil—a dynamic playing out across the arid Western U.S.

"You don't get into the type of drought that we're seeing in the American West right now just from...missing a few storms," said Justin Mankin, a geography professor at Dartmouth College and co-lead of the Drought Task Force at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. "A warm atmosphere evaporates more water from the land surface [and] reduces [the] amount of water available for other uses, like people and hydropower and growing crops."

Precipitation will then spread into Southern California on Monday.

The rain has helped contain some of the nation's largest wildfires this year, including a fire that threatened the Lake Tahoe resort region this summer. Officials said Wednesday night that fire is now 100 percent contained after storms covered the western side of the blaze with snow, while rain fell on the eastern side.

California's "water year" runs from October 1 to September 30. The 2021 water year, which just ended, was the second driest on record. The one before that was the fifth driest on record. Some of the state's most important reservoirs are at record low levels. Things are so bad in Lake Mendocino that state officials say it could be dry by next summer.

Even if California were to have above-average rain and snow this winter, warming temperatures mean it still likely won't be enough to make up for all the water California lost. This past year, California had its warmest ever statewide monthly average temperatures in June, July and October 2020.

Jeanine Jones, interstate resources manager for the California Department of Water Resources, said people should not think about drought "as being just this occasional thing that happens sometimes, and then we go back to a wetter system."

"We are really transitioning to a drier system so, you know, dry becomes the new normal," she said. "Drought is not a short-term feature. Droughts take time to develop, and they usually linger for quite some time."

Read more
  • California Records Driest Year Since 1924 Amid Extreme Heat, Drought
  • Wildfire Warnings to Expand in California as Alisal Fire Spans 24 Miles
  • 'Bomb cyclone' set to batter Pacific Northwest
  • Dozens of Mobile Homes Destroyed as New Wildfires Spark in California

Source : https://www.newsweek.com/california-ski-resort-expecting-enough-snow-over-weekend-that-its-opening-2-weeks-early-1641734

1218
California Ski Resort Expecting Enough Snow Over Weekend That Its Opening 2 Weeks Early

Source:Newsweek

California Ski Resort Expecting Enough Snow Over Weekend That Its Opening 2 Weeks Early

Rain is about to set off the tick time bomb in California

Source:SFGate

Rain is about to set off the tick time bomb in California

California Teacher Placed On Leave After "Offensive" Native American Dance Video Goes Viral

Source:YAHOO!News

California Teacher Placed On Leave After "Offensive" Native American Dance Video Goes Viral

California outlaws future sales of gas leaf blowers and lawn mowers. What to know about the new rule

Source:CNET

California outlaws future sales of gas leaf blowers and lawn mowers. What to know about the new rule

House that turned ‘Elm Street’ into a nightmare lists for $3.2 million in California

Source:Miami Herald

House that turned ‘Elm Street’ into a nightmare lists for $3.2 million in California