Calafia

The plaque marking the Chinese Massacre of 1871 is not easy to find.

Embedded into the sidewalk on North Los Angeles Street in front of the Chinese American Museum downtown, it is one of several bronze markers the museum installed in 2001 to commemorate key moments of Chinese American history in L.A. English and Chinese text is piled into a square smaller than a pizza box, which requires you to stoop over awkwardly to make out the words. I’ve walked over it dozens of times without noticing it.

Its humble proportions belie the plaque’s significance as a rare civic acknowledgment of one of L.A.'s most shameful episodes: the spasm of violence that took place on Oct. 24, 1871, when a mob brutally murdered 18 Chinese men — an estimated 9% of L.A.'s Chinese population — at a time when the city barely registered 5,700 people.

Soon, this important history will no longer get lost underfoot.

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Source : https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-arts/story/2021-10-22/how-a-planned-monument-marking-the-chinese-massacre-of-1871-begins-to-fill-historical-gaps

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